Penn State campuses offer events to celebrate Black History Month in February

Colored Conventions depiction

Few documents from the Colored Conventions mention the women who did so much to organize, host, and coordinate the meetings. This depiction highlights the women whose roles will be the focus of Douglass Day 2022, held on Feb. 14 and hosted by the Center for Black Digital Research.

Credit: Douglass Day/Courtney Murray

Editor's note: This list has been updated as of Thursday, Feb. 17.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — As the second half of Black History Month begins, the University's celebration continues with events across Penn State's campuses — including:

  • Black History Month programs on WPSU-TV, including "Beyond the Baton: A Conductor’s Journey," on Monday, Feb. 21, 9 p.m.; "Fannie Lou Hamer’s America: An America Reframed Special," on Tuesday, Feb. 22, 9 p.m.; and "Ken Burns Presents: Muhamad Ali," Fridays at 9 p.m. through Feb. 18.
  • WPSU World Kitchen for Black History Month featuring Shawn Carter of Carter's Table Catering — Tuesday, Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. Carter will join World Kitchen host Tamra Fatemi-Badi, to talk about traditionally Black food and its history and culture, and to show viewers how to prepare his delicious version of Shrimp and Grits. Registration is free but required at this link.
  • Speaker: Bernice King — Tuesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 p.m., Zoom. Minister, attorney, and chief executive officer of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and the daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., Bernice King will join us virtually for a collaborative speaking engagement sponsored by Penn State Altoona, Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette–The Eberly Campus, and Penn State Greater Allegheny. Registration is required; more information is available here.
  • BLSA Community Summit: "Systemic Violence Against Black Women"Tuesday, Feb. 22, 6-7:30 p.m., Zoom. The Black Law Students Association and the Women's Law Caucus are co-hosting a summit on the systemic violence experienced by black women in the criminal justice system, health care, education, the media and more. Register at this link by Feb. 21.

Full events list

Please note that all in-person, indoor events will require participants to wear masks as per current University COVID-19 requirements.

Penn State University Park

School of Music African American Music FestivalFeb. 1-5.  Join guest artists, students and faculty for a variety of performances and panels showcasing the music of African American composers. The programming kicks off with a livestreamed Feb. 1 Evening Concert at 7:30 p.m., and continues throughout the week with a different Evening Concert Feb. 2, 3 and 4. Also featured are a Feb. 2 Bach's Lunch; a Feb. 4 guest artists panel discussion, "Traditions and Trends in African American Music" in the school's Recital Hall; and a Feb. 5 combined Choir Concert featuring the Penn State Choirs and several guest artists. The entire schedule and details are available here.

Black History Month programming on WPSU and WPSU-FMFeb. 1-25. The Penn State Alumni Association is sponsoring this year’s Black History Month programming on WPSU and WPSU-FM. See the full list of television and radio programs, and how to watch and listen, here.

Black History TriviaFeb. 1-28. The Black Law Students Association is hosting Black history trivia and sharing information about Black businesses on their Instagram page @PennStateLawBLSA.

Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity Black History Month Trivia NightThursday, Feb. 3, 5 p.m., HUB LL011. Students can join the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity for a night full of Black LGBTQ+ history trivia and prizes.

Abra Lee: "Working With the Hands" (Sustainability Showcase Speaker) Friday, Feb. 4, at noon, online. Lee is a horticulturalist and author of the book, “Conquer the Soil: Black America and the Untold Stories of Our Country's Gardeners, Farmers, and Growers.” Her talk will profile the hidden histories of Black Americans who have been influential in horticulture, including an alum of Penn State Mont Alto from the early 1900s. Free and open to all campuses and communities on Zoom; pre-registration is required here.

Identity Talks series “Celebrating Black History” panelTuesday, Feb. 8, 6-7 p.m., online. Join College of Information Sciences and Technology alumni as they share their diverse experiences and perspectives gained through their educational and professional journeys as they navigated the college experience and work to advance their careers and grow their professional networks. This event aims to inspire an open dialogue for students and alumni, and provide unique viewpoints to help all attendees be better prepared to thrive in diverse professional and personal communities. Learn more and register here.

Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity Celebration of Black Queer HistoryWednesday, Feb. 9, 5-8 p.m., HUB LL011. The Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity CSGD will present an exhibit-style night for Black queer history, including the many notable figures and key parts of the civil rights and LGBTQ+ movements.

My Name is Pauli Murray” film and post-film discussion — Wednesday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m., online. The film profiles a largely unknown leader in the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights movements — Pauli Murray, whose legal scholarship helped form the basis of Brown vs. Board of Education and later Ruth Bader Ginsburg's arguments on gender equality and subsequent LGBTQA+ rights cases. Murray was a legal scholar and poet who later became the first African American woman priest in the Episcopal Church. Murray also was a pioneer embracing her true identity as a non-binary person before there was widespread awareness or acceptance of gender fluidity. The film will screen online co-hosted by the Sustainability Institute and WPSU and be followed by a live Zoom panel discussion. Free and open to all campuses and communities; preregistration is required at this link

Film: “American Experience: The American Diplomat” — Thursday, Feb. 10 at 7 p.m. Join WPSU for this special advance screening. At the height of the Cold War, the U.S. State Department remained one of the last agencies to desegregate completely. The film tells the story of the fight for inclusion in American diplomacy through the lives of three African American ambassadors: Edward R. Dudley, Terence Todman and Carl Rowan. Register at this link. If you do not already have a free OVEE account, you will need to register in order to watch the screening, or sign in anonymously.

Amie Bantz: "Lunchbox Moments(Sustainability Showcase Speaker) — Friday, Feb. 11, at noon, online. Bantz is a Pennsylvania-based artist whose "Lunchbox Moments" exhibit helps to spotlight anti-Asian discrimination and bias and to create conversations about creating more inclusive spaces for people of all cultures, races, and ethnicities. Bantz’ showcase talk in the Sustainability Institute's series, co-sponsored by Adult Learner Programs and Services, is free and open to all campuses and communities on Zoom; pre-registration is required here

In addition, Bantz’ “Lunchbox Moments” exhibit will be featured from Jan. 26 to May 15 in the HUB-Robeson Gallery. Bantz’ exhibit uses mixed media lunchboxes to showcase stories Asian Americans have experienced in lunchrooms and schools of discrimination based on their food choices. Bantz also will facilitate two student workshops for creating art and sharing stories about the experience of racial and ethnic bias.

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company present “What Problem?” — Friday, Feb. 11, 7:30 p.m., Eisenhower Auditorium. Choreographer, dancer, theater director and writer Jones’ production explores the tension between belonging to a community and feelings of isolation that many people have during these divisive political times. The Center for the Performing Arts presentation will feature a collaboration with dancers from Penn State and nearby areas. Featuring deconstructed text from Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech and Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick,” the production reflects on King’s immortal words — “We shall overcome” — mixed with the scripture of our nation’s democracy as formed and shaped by “WE THE PEOPLE.” Jones is a two-time Tony Award winner (“FELA!” and “Spring Awakening”). This is a ticketed event; learn more at the CPFA website.

Douglass Day 2022 Monday, Feb. 14, noon-3 p.m. The Center for Black Digital Research invites the campus community to our annual birthday party for Frederick Douglass. Help us transcribe the records of the Colored Conventions, the 19th century’s longest campaign for Black civil rights. Together we can learn about the long history of Black activism — including the important roles of Black women in the conventions. The event will feature a livestreamed program with speakers, performances and more. For more information and to register in advance to participate, visit https://douglassday.org.

Who We Are, All That We Are: Community ConversationsWednesday, Feb. 16, 4:30-6 p.m., Zoom. Having difficult conversations takes practice. "Who We Are, All That We Are" helps builds the skills you need to connect deeper across difference and bring your whole self to the table. This new dialogue series from Student Affairs gives you the chance to tackle challenging topics in a supportive, non-judgmental space, and leave ready to understand yourself and others from a whole new perspective. In February, you'll have the chance to connect with others and build authentic relationships across difference. You'll build the skills you need to push past your comfort zone and address conflict in a meaningful, productive way. Sessions are open to students, faculty and staff. Register online to attend.

Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity Black History Month Movie NightWednesday, Feb. 16, 5 p.m., HUB LL011. The Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity will be showing the documentary "The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson." Join to learn more about Johnson's life and how she helped shaped the LGBQ+ movement. 

Delfeayo Marsalis and Uptown Jazz Orchestra — Monday, Feb. 21, noon, through Feb. 25, noon, online. Delfeayo Marsalis and Uptown Jazz Orchestra will perform a dynamic concert of mostly original music celebrating the resilient and triumphant nature of Americans in the Deep South. From modern riffs to gospel chants, the orchestra will fire up the party with music guaranteed to make you rock, snap and tap. The event will be available to stream for free; visit this link for more information and to register (required).

WPSU World Kitchen for Black History Month featuring Shawn Carter of Carter's Table Catering — Tuesday, Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. Carter will join World Kitchen host Tamra Fatemi-Badi, to talk about traditionally Black food and its history and culture, and to show viewers how to prepare his delicious version of Shrimp and Grits. Registration is free but required at this link.

BLSA Community Summit: "Systemic Violence Against Black Women"Tuesday, Feb. 22, 6-7:30 p.m., Zoom. The Black Law Students Association and the Women's Law Caucus are co-hosting a summit on the systemic violence experienced by black women in the criminal justice system, health care, education, the media and more. Register at this link by Feb. 21.

Movie Night: "Becoming Black Lawyers"Feb. 24 at 6:30 p.m., 116 Katz Building. The Black Law Students Association will host a movie night featuring "Becoming Black Lawyers" with a Q&A afterwards.

Tykee James: "Sustainability Forever" (Sustainability Showcase Speaker) — Friday, Feb. 25, at noon, online. Tykee James is the National Audubon Society's Government Affairs adviser and community environmental activist originally from Philadelphia. He helped establish the Audubon Society's Black Birders Week to enhance diversity and inclusion in the birding movement and to help make the outdoors more welcoming for all people. Free and open to all campuses and communities on Zoom; pre-registration is required here

Lecture: "Advances in PV Toward More Efficient, Just and Sustainable Energy Technologies" with Joseph BerryThursday, Feb. 24, 1 p.m., Zoom. The Penn State Alliance for Education, Science, Engineering and Design with Africa (AESEDA), will host a Black History Month seminar via Zoom with Joseph J. Berry, distinguished alumnus in Penn State's Department of Physics. Learn more and register here.

Jessamyn Stanley yoga class and book event Tuesday, March 1. Author, podcaster, yoga teacher, entrepreneur and advocate, Stanley is an internationally acclaimed leading voice in wellness whose work focuses on 21st-century yoga and intersectional identity. Stanley has written two books and is a regular contributor for SELF Magazine. A self-described “fat-femme” working to break stereotypes and discuss the intersections of fatphobia as well as the white washing of yoga and promoting yoga and healing for every body, Stanley will lead Penn State community members in an inclusive, body positive yoga workshop and class in the late afternoon and then participate in a Moderated Q&A, “Women Providing Healing, Promoting Hope,” in the early evening.

  • Yoga class at 4-5 p.m. in Intramural Building, Gym 3. Registration is required.
  • “Women Providing Healing, Promoting Hope" book signing and moderated Q&A at 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Freeman Auditorium, HUB-Robeson Center.

 

Penn State Abington

Movie Night: "Judas and the Black Messiah" — Wednesday, Feb. 16, 6 p.m. This is collaborative event with the Abington Review, the campus literary magazine.

An Exploration of Black Artists with the Black Student UnionFriday, Feb. 25, 12:20–1:45 p.m., location TBD. This is a collaborative event with Abington Art Appreciation.

Black Minds Matter Discussion Wednesday, Feb. 23, time TBD.

Penn State Altoona

Penn State Altoona will host its 22nd annual African American Read-In on Feb. 13–14. This year’s theme is “The Other African Americans: African Immigrants Writing America,” celebrating works by writers who are Black, African, and American. Find out more information and register for events over the two days here.

Community gathering — Sunday, Feb. 13, 3:30 p.m. in the Slep Student Center. Attendees are invited to share a short reading from a work by an African American author or just listen and enjoy. All guests will get to choose a book to take home with them. Advanced registration is required by Jan. 28.  

“Monday Marathon,” an open mic Read-In — Monday, Feb. 14, 11 a.m.­–5 p.m., Titelman Study of the Misciagna Family Center for Performing Arts.  Various readings will take place celebrating African American writers. Community members are invited to drop in any time throughout the day to participate and/or listen and enjoy. More information here.

Webinar keynote presentation by Kwame Dawes — Monday, Feb 14, noon–1 p.m. Attendees can watch from the Titelman Study or elsewhere via Zoom. Pre-registration for virtual attendance is required.

A writer of poetry, fiction, nonfiction and plays, Dawes spent most of his childhood and early adult life in Jamaica, and is the Glenna Luschei Editor of Prairie Schooner at the University of Nebraska, where he is a Chancellor’s Professor of English, a faculty member of Cave Canem, and a teacher in the Pacific MFA Program in Oregon.  

Romeo OriogunMonday, Feb. 14, 4 p.m. The featured author of the 2022 African American Read-In, Oriogun will give a webinar poetry reading. Attendees can watch from the Titelman Study or elsewhere via Zoom. Pre-registration for virtual attendance is required.    

Oriogun is the author of “Sacrament of Bodies,” a finalist for the Lambda Award for Gay Poetry. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, Harvard Review, American Poetry Review, and others. He is the winner of the 2017 Brunel International African Poetry Prize and a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop where he won the John Logan Prize for Poetry. He also is a postdoctoral research associate at Iowa State University. 

Ebony StewartThursday, Feb. 17, 6:30 p.m., Slep Pondview. An international touring poet and performance artist, Stewart’s work speaks to the black experience, with emphasis on gender, sexuality, womanhood, and race, with the hopes to be relatable, remove shame, heal minds, encourage dialogue, and inspire folks in marginalized communities. 

Speaker: Bernice King — Tuesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 p.m., Zoom. Minister, attorney, and chief executive officer of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and the daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., Bernice King will join us virtually for a collaborative speaking engagement sponsored by Penn State Altoona, Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette–The Eberly Campus, and Penn State Greater Allegheny. Registration is required; more information is available here.

Penn State Behrend

The African American Inventors & Inventions Traveling MuseumWednesday, Feb. 16, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Reed Wintergarden. The museum will display a unique collection of inventions, artifacts and African Art. Founded by Alabama native Clifton J. Brown, the museum showcases a variety of products that were created by Black inventors, including the programmable remote control and the blue U.S. Postal Service street boxes. 

The Kotchegna Dance CompanyWednesday, Feb. 16, noon, Bruno’s Café. The company will perform a free concert, with traditional dance and drumming from Africa’s Ivory Coast. The troupe was founded by Vado Diomande, who was raised in the stilt-dancing tradition of the Mahou people in Ivory Coast. He later danced in Ballet National. This performance is part of the Rhythms of Life Series, which features music, dance and storytelling from all regions of the world.

Penn State Berks

“Black Families and Mindfulness: Considering an Afrocentric Approach”Feb. 3, noon, online.  Join the Department of Humanities for a Grand Rounds and Black History Month lecture, presented via Zoom by Kesha Morant Williams, associate professor of communication arts and sciences, and coordinator of the Bioethics and Medical Humanities Minor program at Penn State Berks. More details are available here

Black History Festival — Thursday, Feb. 6, 3 p.m., Perkins Student Center Auditorium. Hosted by the Penn State Berks Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee, in partnership with the Reading School District. Attendees will view the blockbuster film “Black Panther,” followed by a discussion and an exhibit of Black history and culture. This event is free and open to the public and light refreshments will be served. For more information, contact Sharon Pitterson-Ogaldez, coordinator of diversity and international programs, at 610-396-6080 or via email at SUP373@psu.edu.

Mike Africa Jr., activist, speaker, hip hop artist — Wednesday, Feb. 9, 7 p.m., Perkins Student Center Auditorium. A member of MOVE, a Philadelphia-based communal organization with philosophies of black nationalism and anarcho-primitivism, Africa travels the country telling his life story and inspiring others. He is the host of the podcast “On a Move with Mike Africa, Jr.,” and the star of the HBO Max documentary, “40 Years A Prisoner.” For more information, contact the Office of Campus Life at 610-396-6076.

Zuzu African Acrobats — Tuesday, Feb. 22, 6 p.m., Perkins Student Center Auditorium. Hailing from Tanzania, the group celebrates the 2,000-year-old Bantu culture of East Africa. Each member of the cast has received special instructions from elders in the Bagamoyo Arts and Cultural Institute to perform these ancient traditions and to share them with audiences around the world. Some of the highlights of this training include proficiency with the ngoma (drum), contortion (ubishi wa solo), dish spinning (sahani inazunguka), chair balance (kusawazisha kiti), unicycles and bicycle tricks (baiskeli), human pyramids (mazoezi ya viungo) and much more — all to the sounds of African beats. For more information, contact the Office of Campus Life at 610-396-6076.

Penn State Brandywine

Documentary screening and panel discussionFeb. 3, noon, at Student Union 114-117. Penn State alumnus Jake Mejias recently produced a documentary, "Wake," surrounding the aftermath of George Floyd's murder and the protests that followed in Philadelphia. The film sparks important discussions surrounding systemic racism and the inequalities minorities face in America. The screening will be followed by a panel that will participate in a Q&A session as well as react to the film and curate a thoughtful discussion among other panelists and attendees. Open to Penn State Brandywine students, faculty and staff. Register online.

Soul Sounds, The Evolution of Black Music Feb. 8, 12:15-1:15 p.m., at Student Union 114-117. Take a "hip trip" through the evolution of Black Music with live performances and multi-media. Enjoy a range of music from Motown, gospel, blues, and Urban Contemporary. Open to Penn State Brandywine students, faculty and staff. Sponsored by the Office of Student Engagement.

Black History Month Trivia Game Show — Feb. 10, 12:15-1:15 p.m., at Parsons Hall. Test your knowledge of Black History. Prizes will be awarded. Open to Penn State Brandywine students, faculty and staff. Sponsored by the Office of Student Engagement.

Documentary screening and panel discussion — Feb. 10, 6 p.m., at Tomezsko Classroom Building 103-104. Penn State alumnus Jake Mejias recently produced a documentary, "Wake," surrounding the aftermath of George Floyd's murder and the protests that followed in Philadelphia. The film sparks important discussions surrounding systemic racism and the inequalities minorities face in America. The screening will be followed by a panel that will participate in a Q&A session as well as react to the film and curate a thoughtful discussion among other panelists and attendees. Open to the community. Register online.

Zuzu African Acrobats — Feb. 24, 5 p.m., at Parsons Hall. Dancing, dish spinning, cyr wheel, gumboot dance, unicycle/bicycle tricks, chair balancing, hand balancing, human pyramid, contortionist and a special parade of African animal puppets! Open to Penn State Brandywine students, faculty and staff. Sponsored by the Office of Student Engagement.

Celebration of Hip Hop — Feb. 25, 8 p.m., at Student Union 114-117. Learn the history of hip hop through activities and listening experiences. Open to Penn State Brandywine students.

Penn State Dickinson Law

“The Racial Pay Gap” lecture — Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 3:30 p.m., Zoom. Professor Stephanie Bornstein from the University of Florida Levin College of Law will deliver the lecture “The Racial Pay Gap." RSVP for the lecture in advance for the Zoom link.  Attendees will be able to ask questions and engage in conversation with Bornstein at the end of the program. This lecture is also the start of an intersectional speaker series over the semester focused on gender and racial equity. To learn more about the lecture topic, Bornstein's abstract is available here.

Black Girl Chronicles Learning Series in Carlisle — Thursday, Feb. 24, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., YWCA of Carlisle, 301 G. Street. Hope Station Carlisle will host the Black Girl Chronicles Learning Series, a conference centered on topics and issues facing Black women. Workshops led by Black female leaders as well as a keynote speaker, a round table session and an opportunity to shop local Black-owned businesses. Doors will open at 9:30 for the vendor expo. The Academic & Student Services Office will pay for the registration fee of any Dickinson Law student who expresses an interest in attending by Feb. 11. Complete the interest form here.

Penn State DuBois

“Brandon Martin: A Voice of Justice” — Thursday, Feb. 3, 7 p.m., Hiller Bldg 007. Martin is a multi-genre vocalist, composer/arranger, conductor and music educator who is currently a performer with the Voices of Liberty at Epcot as well as with the Dapper Dans Barbershop Quartet at Magic Kingdom. He has performed at Carnegie Hall and as a contestant on “Showtime at the Apollo.” In his program, he includes songs of protest and songs of hope and redemption to present a full educational and inspirational program that focuses on social justice as told through song.

Speaker: Bernice King — Tuesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 p.m., Zoom. Minister, attorney, and chief executive officer of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and the daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., Bernice King will join us virtually for a collaborative speaking engagement sponsored by Penn State Altoona, Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette–The Eberly Campus, and Penn State Greater Allegheny. Registration is required; more information is available here.

Penn State Fayette, The Eberly Campus

Speaker: Bernice King — Tuesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 p.m., Zoom. Minister, attorney, and chief executive officer of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and the daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., Bernice King will join us virtually for a collaborative speaking engagement sponsored by Penn State Altoona, Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette–The Eberly Campus, and Penn State Greater Allegheny. Registration is required; more information is available here.

Penn State Greater Allegheny

Speaker: Bernice King — Tuesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 p.m., Zoom. Minister, attorney, and chief executive officer of the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and the daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., Bernice King will join us virtually for a collaborative speaking engagement sponsored by Penn State Altoona, Penn State DuBois, Penn State Fayette–The Eberly Campus, and Penn State Greater Allegheny. Registration is required; more information is available here.

Penn State Harrisburg

Joan “Lyrical” LeslieTuesday, Feb. 1, at 6 p.m. Oliver LaGrone Cultural Arts Center, Olmsted Building. Slam poet Joan “Lyrical” Leslie will share her lyrical content as she expresses the Black experience.

ZuZu AcrobatsWednesday, Feb. 16 at 7 p.m., Mukund S. Kulkarni Theatre, Student Enrichment Center. A five-person, Kenyan acrobatic group which embodies the Bantu culture of East Africa, ZuZu Acrobats will present a show featuring fast pyramid building, limbo, chair balancing, comedy, fast skip rope, juggling and much more all set to high energy Lingala music. The event is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required. For more information, please call 717-948-6273.

"Natural Hair: An Identity of Authenticity," Thursday, Feb. 17 at 6:30 p.m., Oliver LaGrone Cultural Arts Center. This panel discussion will be comprised of three Black women from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They will share stories and their experiences wearing their hair natural. There are many stigmas with natural hair, and they will discuss how to advocate for yourself to show up authentically. Panelists include: Keea Hart, Girls Running Sh*t; Mia Marshall, Luxurae Hair; and Janita Kelgore, marketing/communications specialist and creative.

Just Dessert: Celebration of Black History and Networking Event, Wednesday, Feb. 23, 5:45 p.m., Olmsted Gallery Lounge and Oliver LaGrone Cultural Arts Center. This event aims to facilitate dialogue to help student participants initiate conversations and network. Speakers include Christine Titih, founder and president of Oaks of Central PA; Felicia Brown-Haywood, associate vice president of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Institutional Success at Lebanon Valley College; and Shauntey James, assistant teaching professor of criminal justice in Penn State Harrisburg’s School of Public Affairs.

"Speak To My Soul: A Montage of Voices," Saturday, Feb. 26, 5:30 p.m., The Ware Center, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion will sponsor a trip to The Ware Center in Lancaster to see "Speak To My Soul: A Montage of Voices," a two-act choreopoem that tells a story of the Black experience. Tickets are limited. Registration is required. This is a free event for all Penn State Harrisburg students. Information will be provided to those who have registered regarding bus pick up. 

Penn State Hazleton

Black History Month Submissions Contest — Jan. 21 through Feb. 21. Students are encouraged to create a painting, poster, drawing, video, or other creative format sharing what Black History Month means to them. Submissions will then be shared at a special showcase to the campus community on Thursday, Feb. 24. (Time/location TBD.) Entries can be dropped off at the Student Engagement Office in Butler 105 or emailed to David Laird, coordinator of residence life and student engagement, at dll316@psu.edu.

Penn State Scranton

Black History Month TriviaTuesday, Feb. 8 at 3 p.m. in The View Café. Neon Entertainment will present, hosted by entertainer and comedian Mikki Hommel, an educational and entertaining Black History Month-themed Trivia for all participants! Contestants will learn about prominent Black historical figures including athletes, Civil Rights leaders, inventors, and more. Each question is multiple choice. Contestants can win prizes.

Melanin Monday: Black History Month Kick-offMonday, Feb. 21, Noon to 1 p.m., View Café. The theme of Black History Month at Penn State Scranton is “Blackness: An Identity with Multiple Meanings.” This Melanin Monday event will feature games, music and other tenets of Black, African, African-American, African-diaspora, and Afro-Latin cultures for participants to experience and participate in. Free food will be available.

Cultural Dialogues: Black BazaarTuesday, Feb. 22, Noon to 2 p.m. Come celebrate the multiplicity of Blackness as an identity at the Black Bazaar. This event will feature five local black-owned and operated businesses and organizations from the surrounding Scranton-NEPA area who represent a diverse makeup of Blackness and give it a multitude of meanings. They will talk about roles in serving the Black community and offer items for participants to take home. Hosted in partnership with external Diversity Award Recipient Rashida Lovely, Student Government Association, Student Organization of Latinos, and Black Student Union.

African Dance with Erico Ansuade (dance-only workshop)Wednesday, Feb. 23, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m, Study Learning Center’s Sherbine Lounge. In partnership with the Diversity Office, Penn State Scranton welcomes master djembe player and dancer Erico Ansuade to campus to host a two-day workshop in drumming and dance, with the first day featuring dancing only. Ansuade hails from Ghana, Africa and teaches a variety of dance-drumming styles from Ghana, Guinea, Senegal, Burkina Faso and other surrounding countries. He has performed with world-class national dance companies in West Africa and offers dance-drum workshops at all skill levels.

African Dance-Drumming with Erico AnsuadeThursday, Feb. 24, 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., View Café. In partnership with the Diversity Office, Penn State Scranton welcomes master djembe player and dancer Erico Ansuade to campus to host a two-day workshop in drumming and dance. The second day will feature dancing and drumming workshops with a break for lunch in the middle. Ansuade hails from Ghana, Africa and teaches a variety of dance-drumming styles from Ghana, Guinea, Senegal, Burkina Faso and other surrounding countries. He has performed with world-class national dance companies in West Africa and offers dance-drum workshops at all skill levels.

Zuzu African AcrobatsFriday, Feb 25, Noon to 1 p.m. in the Multipurpose Building gym. Penn State Scranton welcomes “America’s Got Talent” semi-finalists, the Zuzu African Acrobats. The five-person Kenyan Acrobatic show embodies the Bantu culture of East Africa, featuring fast pyramid building, limbo, chair balancing, comedy, fast skip rope, juggling and much more, all set to high-energy lingala music. Free Kenyan snacks will be available at the event.

Penn State Shenango

In honor of Black History Month, Penn State Shenango will feature the annual February Diversity Series hosted by the campus Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee. 

Soul Food Feast  — Wednesday, Feb. 2, 12:15-1:15 p.m., Great Hall.  Shenango students and employees can pick up a meal voucher for lunch in Student Affairs or Academic Affairs.

Film Screening: "American Denial" (2015, 54 min.) — Thursday, Feb. 10, 12 p.m., Sharon Hall 105. Associate Professor Phil Nash will welcome viewers and provide commentary before screening. Refreshments will be provided. 

Black History Month Free-Throw ContestMonday, Feb.14, halftime at 6 and 8 p.m. basketball games, Buhl Club in Sharon. There is a $1 flat fee to enter the contest; proceeds will benefit diversity, equity, and inclusion programming for the Shenango community. The winner of each contest will receive a $50 gift card to the Penn State Bookstore. Follow Penn State Shenango Athletics for more information.

Presentation: "Court Watch: It's Purpose and Impact" with Autumn Redcross, director of Abolitionist Law Center’s court watch program — Thursday, Feb. 17, 12:15, Sharon Hall 105 and Zoom. Connection information will be provided to the campus community.

Presentation: "The Importance of Inclusive Campus Climates" with Emil Cunningham, vice president of external relations/executive associate/project manager at Rankin & Associates Consulting — Wednesday, Feb. 23, 12:15-1:15 p.m., Sharon Hall 105 and Zoom. Connection information will be provided to the campus community. 

Penn State York

Black History Month Spotlights Around CampusFrom Feb. 1 to 28. Posters displayed throughout the campus will feature photos, quotes and biographical information about famous Black people throughout history.

Zuzu African AcrobatsWednesday, Feb. 23, 7 p.m., Pullo Family Performing Arts Center.  Singing, dancing and jaw-dropping acrobatics are all a part of a free performance by Zuzu African Acrobats. The show is open to the public and no tickets are needed. All those who attend must wear a mask. Read all about the event here.

“What They Didn’t Teach you in History Class – America’s Hidden True Black History” Thursday, March 3, 12:15 p.m., in the Precision Custom Components Community Room of the Joe and Rosie Ruhl Student Community Center on campus. As a retired law enforcement professional and director of the traveling True Black History Museum, Fred Saffold will present an interactive workshop, pulling from his background and years of activism and racial justice advocacy as the source of a pivotal understanding of the depth of racial justice work. For more information, contact Sarah Guillen at sjm69@psu.edu or call 717-771-4045.

Pennsylvania College of Technology

Fred Saffold lecture: “What They Didn’t Teach You in History Class” Tuesday, Feb. 8, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Penn’s Inn, Bush Campus Center. For more information, visit this link.

The True Black History Museum (traveling museum) — Tuesday, Feb. 8, 1-5 p.m.Penn’s Inn, Bush Campus Center. For more information, visit the True Black History Museum website.